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Pimbley's Dictionary of Heraldry: B, Page Three

Heraldic Terms from Bend to Bitted

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Bend - One of the ordinaries. It is formed of two lines, and is drawn from the dexter chief to the sinister base point of the escutcheon. It generally occupies one-fifth of the field; but formerly it was one-fifth only when plain, and one-third when charged.

The bend is said to have been derived from the border on a woman's cap known as a bend. It is possible that its origin was a representation of the baldric. According to some, the origin was a scaling ladder. In the beginning of heraldry the bend was a mark of cadency, but later became an honorable ordinary.

    "The diminutives of the bend are the bendlet, garter or gartier, which is half its width; the cost or cottice, which is one-fourth; and the riband, which is one-eighth." - (Gloss. of Her.)

Bend Sinister - An ordinary resembling the bend in form, but extending from the sinister chief to the dexter base. The diminutives of the bend sinister are the scarpe, which is half its width; and the baton, half as wide as the scarpe and couped.

In Bend - When bearings are placed bendwise the term in bend is used.

Per Bend - [See party per bend, under PARTY.]

Bending - The same as BENDY. (Chaucer.)

Bendlet - A diminutive of the bend. Generally it is half the width of the bend; but sometimes it appears much narrower. In ancient heraldry a bendlet azure on a coat was a mark of cadency.

    "Bendlets are occasionally enhanced or placed in chief sinister.." - (Gloss. of Her.)

Bendy - An escutcheon having bends which divide it diagonally into four, six or more parts is called bendy. The lines are drawn in the same direction described under BEND: when drawn in the contrary direction they are styled bendy sinister.

Bend Barry - [See Barry Bendy.]

Bendy Lozengy - Having each lozenge placed in bend.

Bendy Piley - Divided into an equal number of pieces by piles placed bendwise across the escutcheon.

Beque - (Bee'-kay) Beaked. This term is used of a bird having its bill of a color different from that of the body. [See BEAKED.]

Bevelled - [See BEVILLED.]

Bevilled - (Bev'-illed) When the outward lines of an ordinary turn in a sloping direction.

Bevilways - At a bevil. This term is used of charges or anything similar.

Bezant - (Be'-zant) A gold roundlet, representing a coin of that name. It is supposed to have been introduced into English heraldry by the Crusaders, who had received the gold coin while in the East. [See also ROUNDEL.] [For Cross Bezant, see under CROSS.]

Bezante - (Be-zan'-tay) Covered or studded with bezants; seme of bezants.

Bicapitated - (By-cap'-i-ta-ted) Having two heads, such as the two-headed eagle on the arms of Russia, as well as on those of Austria.

Bicorporate - (By-cor'-por-ate) Having two bodies; having the hinder parts in duplicate, with one head and one pair of forepaws.

Big - [See BIGG.]

Bigg - Barley. Specifically, the barley common to the north of Scotland, having six rows of seed. Bigland of Bigland bore "Azure, two ears of bigg or." (Also written big.)

Billhead - The head of a bill. Generally borne on a charge. (The bill was a war instrument - a species of halberd.)

Billet - (Bill'-et) (1) An oblong square, supposed to represent a sheet of paper folded in the form of a letter. Its proportion is two squares. (2) A staff as a billet, raguled and tricked, meaning a ragged staff in pale. (Gloss.of Her.)

Billetty - (Bill'-et-ty) Seme of billets.

Billetty Counter-Billetty - Barry and paley, the divisions of the former being as wide again as those of the latter.

Bird - Birds figure to a large extent in heraldry, and represent the contemplative as well as active life. Among those used with the greatest frequency are the following:

    Eagle
    Falcon
    Swan
    Peacock
    Pelican
    Ostrich
    Stork
    Heron
    Cormorant
    Sheldrake
    Raven
    Rook
    Owl
    Cock
    Popinjay
    Cough
    Shoveller
    Swallow

Among the terms applied to birds are Membered, Armed, Closed, Disclosed, Rising and Volant.

Bird and Bantling - A Lancashire term, applied to the well-known crest of the Stanleys of an eagle preying on a child.

Bird-bolt - A short arrow with a broad, flat end.

Bitted - Said of a horse when borne with a bit of a different tincture from the animal itself, when it is said to be bitted of that color. This term is also used to describe a horse's head with bit and rein; as, "Three horses' heads couped, bitted and reined or."



Find another term:

A

Bachelor to Barrully
Barry to Belt
Bend to Bitted
Black to Blue Mantle
Boar to Bute

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